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Costello slams ‘victimhood’

Tim Costello has used his last day as head of World Vision Australia to call out middle-class Australians and their ‘huge sense of victimhood,’ The New Daily reports.

Speaking to The New Daily, Mr Costello said Australians had lost ‘perspective’ of what’s important.

“Middle-class people think they’re doing it tough – the sense of victimhood is huge. We’ve got a whining middle-class culture.

“We are blessed, we’re the third-richest country per capita in the world. When you lose that perspective, you lose that generosity.”

Stepping down on Friday after 13 years at the helm of the charity group, Mr Costello said the nation suffers from ‘compassion fatigue’ and felt overwhelmed by world events.

The numbers back up Mr Costello’s remarks, with the proportion of Australians donating to charity steadily dropping since 2015.

Recent research from Roy Morgan shows the proportion of Australians donating to charity has fallen from 61.8 per cent in 2014, to 60 per cent last year.

While the average size of donations has grown to $486 in that time, it hasn’t kept pace in real-terms with the $460 recorded in 2014

But Mr Costello was quick to note Australians’ recent efforts to tighten their purse strings isn’t confined to the middle-class, and that same miserly spirit has come to haunt Parliament, repeatedly breaking promises to help the world’s poorest people.

“The government has been mean. We made a promise of 0.7 per cent of gross national income going in aid, all rich countries did. Ours is down to 0.21 – that’s 21 cents in $100.

“We’ve given ourselves a leave pass. It’s not who Australians are – we share; we know we are blessed. It’s the greatest shame to me just as an Australian.”

FULL STORY

Tim Costello slams middle-class Australians for their ‘huge sense of victimhood’ (The New Daily)
Stepping down from the helm of the charity, Mr Costello said that the nation suffers from ‘compassion fatigue’

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